• FASD Face to face course

  • FASD Face to face training course – CPD Accredited

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    This is a specialist Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder in-house Training course.

    As the training is bespoke it can be adapted to be suitable for different staff needs and foster carer needs. Information about FASD:

    Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the leading known preventable intellectual disability and is only caused by prenatal alcohol exposure.

    FASD refers to a set of physical, mental and neurobehavioural disorders which are a direct result of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy.International studies have suggested that between 1% and 5% of people may have this condition. Naturally these babies grow up and will require support throughout their lives.

    Undiagnosed children may be diagnosed with ADHD, ODD, as being on the autistic spectrum, as having behavioural problems or as having had poor parenting.

    Studies suggest that without the correct diagnosis and support an individual is more likely to have a range of issues including: mental health problems, trouble with the police, homelessness and difficulty with social relationships and employment.

    These figures are based on the general population, but some experts believe that up to 70% of looked after children could have been exposed to alcohol prenatally.

    The course:

    The training session is bespoke and therefore designed to meet your needs. The session takes into account the different learning styles of participants and has aspects that are auditory, visual and kinaesthetic. The course contains a combination of slides, videos, interactive exercises and case studies. Participants are encouraged to make use of the training pack to help with their learning.

    By the end of the course Participants should be able to: ·

    Identify the causes and the long term effects of FASD

    • Explain the difference between FAS (Foetal Alcohol Syndrome) and FASD
    • Identify the behaviours and needs of someone with FASD throughout their different life stages
    • Explore the possibility that some of their clients may be affected by FASD
    • Understand how to get a diagnosis
    • Assess how the clients can best be supported and identify strategies to achieve this

     

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